Forum Posts

Foss Shanahan
Oct 19, 2022
In User Manual
The provisions assessment on Rico makes it easier to assess statutory document provisions like Matters, Assessment Criteria, Objectives and Policies. We’ve noticed this can lead to some planners choosing to craft their assessments differently in Rico. In particular, what assessment is included under the provisions assessment versus the assessment of environmental effects. There’s no ‘correct’ approach, but we’ve listed a few rules of thumb below for guidance: Where provisions direct you to more specific considerations (often the case with Matters and Assessment Criteria), commenting directly against these provisions can make assessments clearer. Where an application is for controlled or restricted discretionary activities, including the relevant provisions can make the scope of the assessment clearer as the effects that can be considered are restricted. Where a proposal contains more activities that have overlapping provisions (i.e. multiple provisions addressing the same considerations) it’s better to assess effects more generally to avoid repetition and incohesive assessments. Where a proposal is discretionary or non-complying (Note #1), providing assessments directly against relevant objectives and policies can provide additional clarity and confidence as to how the proposal is consistent with provisions. Where a proposal is discretionary or non-complying (Note #2), a general effects assessment is typically favoured as there is no restriction on the scope of this assessment and effects tend to be considered more widely than what is directly provided for in the plan. If you’re interested, it’s worth experimenting along these lines as this can save time and help make your assessments clearer, both to create and to assess after.
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Foss Shanahan
Aug 24, 2022
In User Manual
Plans are being continuously updated and so are the documents on Rico containing rules and provisions. How do we manage plan changes with respect to documents on Rico? Regular documents on Rico are kept up to date with operative rules and provisions. Where a change within the statutory framework has legal effect (before being made operative), we will add an additional document for this plan change containing changes to rules and provisions so it can be included in your project and assessed like a regular document. Where a change does not have legal effect, we will flag this as a consideration on the current operative version of the document which can be seen when a document is assessed so you are alerted to a change affecting the proposal for you to investigate further. How are changes handled in the assessment process? Where a change results in new or different documents being relevant to a proposal A checklist question has been created to detect plan changes that apply to the subject site Where plan changes apply, you must investigate these to determine whether this results in new or different documents applying to the proposal and then ensure the correct documents, including any plan change documents are added to your project on the considerations page. Where a change results in different rules or provisions being relevant to a proposal As mentioned earlier, a document for proposed changes that have legal affect will be available on Rico to enable you to assess changes to/new rules and provisions. Where rules or provisions don't have legal effect, you can assess the impact of these changes on the proposal in your qualitative assessments.
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Foss Shanahan
Jun 12, 2022
In FAQs
An application for multiple activities may be treated as separate activities or as one overall bundle of activities. The bundling section at the bottom of the activities overview page enables you to include an assessment of how the application should be assessed (unbundled, or bundled). Below runs through an example of how this should be used. Where a proposal: consists of more than one activity specified in the plan(s); and involves more than one type of resource consent or requires more than one resource consent; and the effects of the activities overlap; the activities may be considered together. Where different activities within a proposal have effects that do not overlap, the activities will be considered separately. Example responses for various situations have been included below to be used as general guidance for completing this section: Unbundled (e.g. joint land use and subdivision application) In this instance, subdivision is proposed around an approved development and therefore the land use component of this application needs to be granted and given effect to before the subdivision can proceed on the basis proposed. The effects of the two resource consent types do not overlap. The land use consent could be given effect to without a subsequent subdivision. While the subdivision as applied for is reliant on the land use consent being granted, it is not a pre-requisite to apply for the two consents concurrently, and they could be applied for and considered separately. Therefore, the activities will be considered separately for notification under s95 and decision-making under s104. The activity status of the activities are as follows: Land use (s9): [activity status] activity Subdivision (s11): [activity status] activity Where other types of resource consents (such as a discharge consent under s15) apply, this section can be modified to include this type of consent instead of/in addition to the land use and subdivision consents. Such as: Other type of resource consent (section of RMA consent required under): [activity status] activity Bundled In this instance, the effects of the proposed resource consents will overlap and thus they are considered together as a [activity status] activity overall. DISCLAIMER: It's important to note that the correct approach to bundling will vary from application to application. The above is a general discussion and approach only. Rico takes no responsibility for the accuracy and completeness of your applications and of any reports, documents or advice given by you in conjunction with the use of this information. Rico Technologies Ltd is not liable for any errors or omissions.
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Foss Shanahan
Feb 22, 2022
In User Manual
You can view how work completed in Rico’s workflow will look in final report outputs using the Review tab. This is useful for reviewing reports before downloading and seeing how work completed in the workflow fits into the ‘bigger picture’ of the overall report being completed. Opening the Review tab Access the review tab, by clicking the blue ‘Review’ tab on the right-hand edge of your display. On smaller displays, the Review tab will slide out over the workflow (on the left), only allowing you to navigate through the Review tab. On larger displays, the Review tab will appear next to the workflow so you can navigate through both the Review tab and the workflow, simultaneously, creating a more fluid experience. Tip: To view the review tab and workflow simultaneously on smaller displays, you can adjust the zoom on your web browser, zooming out until both appear side by side. Navigating within the Review tab Change the report you’re viewing Where multiple report outputs exist, you can select the report output you wish to view using the drop-down at the top of the Review tab. Jump to pages At the bottom of the Review tab are three navigation buttons: Jump to current page - navigates you to the page in the reports where the step in the workflow you’re currently viewing will be output. Table of Contents - opens up the table of contents of the current report you’re viewing where you can select a section to jump to. Scroll to Top - takes you back to the top of the current document you’re viewing. Jumping between the Review tab and workflow Clicking content in the Review tab will jump you to the relevant place in the workflow where that content can be edited. This enables you to easily navigate to areas that need attention from the review tab. Downloading Reports Clicking the download button at the top right of the Review tab will download the report selected in the dropdown (to the left of the download button). Note: The report preview may not always be an exact representation when it comes to finer details which depend on the word processor you’re using. Page numbers are not populated until the document is downloaded and opened, therefore, it is suggested that you refer to section headings as opposed to page numbers when writing assessments.
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Foss Shanahan
Feb 22, 2022
In User Manual
This page is where a project’s appendices are recorded. Appendices entered here can be referenced throughout projects and are inserted into an appendices table in the report. To add an appendix: Click Add Appendix. This will create a new row in the appendix table where the relevant information for the appendix can be entered. Complete the blank cells. Adjust the order. If multiple appendices have been added, the order can be adjusted using the up and down arrows in the order column at the left of the appendices table. The numbering scheme for ordering appendices can be changed to numbers or letters as preferred using the selector above the appendix table. See Appendix References to see how to make reference to an appendix while completing assessments.
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Foss Shanahan
Feb 22, 2022
In User Manual
The plan document assessment is where rules and matters from plan documents are assessed. Plan documents are added to a project in the initial stages of Rico: Subject Site; Project Checklist; and, Considerations. To clarify, plan documents, rules and matters are defined as: Plan documents are sections of the planning system being assessed in Rico. These correspond to sections of plans etc. and are labelled accordingly, for example, a plan chapter being assessed is labelled with the title of that chapter. Rules are those parts of a plan document that determine the activity status of a proposal and reasons for consent (where applicable). This in turn determines whether resource consent is needed and the nature of the resource consent decisions to be made for a proposal. Matters are those parts of a plan document that inform the decision-making process for a resource consent application. The plan document assessment consists of the following sections: Rules Matters Environmental Effects Assessment (discussed here) In addition to this, in the top right-hand corner of the plan document assessment, there are the options to view the plan document directly at its source (View PDF), import an entire plan document assessment from another project (Import), and delete the plan document from the project (Delete). Rules Activities The activities section is where activities triggered by a proposal under a given plan document are added. To add activities: Click the add activity button. This will open a window where you can select activities for the plan document being assessed. Select an activity. Activities are listed in the activity selector and organised under the headings they appear in source plan documents. You can also review source plan documents for relevant activities here. Reviewing the source documents can assist in detecting relevant considerations for a proposal. Links to the source plan documents are provided on the activities page in two locations, a link in the instruction at the top of the page (i.e. "Review the activity table ….") and within the window for adding activities at the right of the activity selector. Ensure the correct activity status is selected. The status of an activity is generally known, however, in some cases, it may vary (e.g. due to characteristics of the proposal). In such cases, the status must be entered manually here. Provide an activity description. The description aims to clearly detail the activities in the proposal that fall under the definition of the selected activity from a given plan document. Click add activity to project to finish. Standards The standards section is where the proposal’s compliance with the relevant standards from a given plan document is assessed. To assess standards: Work out the standards to be complied with. This can be determined by reviewing the source plan document (this states the standards to be complied with for certain activities). You can jump to source documents by clicking the document icon located at the right of the standard assessment bar. On Rico, all the available standards from a given plan document are listed. Once you’ve worked out what’s relevant and irrelevant, these can be filtered. Relevant standards are assessed as described in the next steps, while irrelevant standards are marked “N/A”. Only standards that have been assessed will appear in reports. Assess relevant standards. Determine whether the proposal complies or infringes with a given standard and click the corresponding complies or infringes button in Rico. Details of the standard can be reviewed at this stage by clicking the document icon which links to the source plan document. After marking complies or infringes, justify this assessment in the text field. Infringed standards require an additional step, discussed further below. Infringed standards When a standard is infringed, you must answer whether the infringement adds a general (C1.9(2)) infringement or if the infringement has been accounted for already or is not a standard that must be complied with. The following diagram describes how to correctly address an infringed standard in various circumstances. Where a standard is infringed resulting in a general infringement, an activity/reason for consent is created for this on the activities page. Like other activities, this has a reference, status and description as follows: The reference identifies the infringement (under rule C1.9(2) of the AUP) and refers to the specific standard infringed. The status is restricted discretionary (as per rule C1.9(2)). The activity description is automatically populated with the comment made against the infringed standard on the standards page. This comment can only be edited on the standards page and cannot be edited on the activities page. Matters Proposals are assessed against the relevant matters of a given plan document in the matters assessment. This is done in two steps, reviewing matters to determine which are relevant, then including any assessment thereof to appear in reports. Reviewing matters Proposals must be consistent with the relevant matters of a plan document in order for consent to be granted. The relevant matters for a given proposal depend on the activities involved and application status. For controlled and restricted discretionary activities, the relevant matters are restricted to the matters of control and matters of discretion, respectively. Assessment criteria may also be provided for restricted discretionary and controlled activities to elaborate and provide clarity on how these matters will be assessed. All applications for resource consent (i.e. applications with non-permitted activities) must be consistent with the objectives and policies. Assessing matters Matters can be assessed using the expandable lists to the left (or top on smaller screens) of the page to produce a tabular assessment and/or the overall assessment to the right (or bottom on smaller screens) to produce an overall assessment. How matters are assessed is down to personal preference. You may complete both, either, or neither of these assessments as per the steps below. Tabular Matters Assessment The tabular assessment provides the opportunity to go into depth and comment directly against specific matters or groups of matters. To prepare a tabular matters assessment: Select matters. Navigate through the expandable lists to find relevant matters. Check the checkbox at the right of the matter to include it in your report. Checkboxes can appear in three states, depending on what’s been selected: unchecked = the matter has not been selected, partially filled = the matter has sub-points and some, not all, of these have been selected, checked = the matter and any sub-points below it have all been selected. Comment on matters. Click the comment button (just to the left of the checkbox) to comment on a matter or group of matters. Comments will appear in the table adjacent to the matters they correspond to. A separate table will be produced in report downloads for each separate list of matters (i.e. Objectives, Policies, Matters of Discretion, Assessment Criteria etc.) that have been assessed. If you don’t wish to include a tabular matters assessment, leave all matters unchecked and no table will appear in the report. Overall Assessment The overall assessment provides the opportunity to make a more general assessment of the matters for a given plan document without including or commenting directly against specific matters. To make an overall assessment: Click ‘Include overall assessment’. This is located on the right hand side of the page (or below the expandable lists on smaller screens). Enter your assessment in the text box. It’s suggested that headings are used to provide a title to, or structure, this assessment as no heading is given to this section by default. If you don’t wish to include an overall assessment, select ‘Exclude overall assessment’ and no overall assessment will appear in the report. If neither a tabular matters assessment nor overall assessment are included, no matters assessment section will appear in the report for a given plan document. Import In addition to the import function in each text box, the planning document assessment has the option to import whole document assessments from existing jobs. To import a whole document assessment for a given planning document: Click 'Import', located at the top right of the page. Select a source project. You can open projects in a new tab to preview these before importing them into your project. Click 'Import' to complete the import. Doing this will copy all the assessments from the source project into the current project. Be careful, where data exists in both projects, the contents of the current project will be overridden.
Using the Plan Document Assessment (Rules & Matters) content media
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Foss Shanahan
Feb 22, 2022
In User Manual
Throughout various pages of Rico, assessments are entered into text fields. These text fields include text editing functionality, like you see in most other text editors, and several other functions specific to Rico. The following items are covered in this post: Basic Formatting Undo and Redo Headings Inserting Appendix References Inserting Figures Import Todos Basic Formatting The following formatting options are provided: Bold Italic Underline Superscript Subscript Highlight Numbered Lists Bullet List To apply formatting, simply highlight the text you wish to format and click the option you’d like to apply from the editing toolbar. Undo and Redo The editing toolbar includes undo and redo buttons. These enable you to undo and redo changes made to a text field. Important: If you leave the page a text field is on or refresh the page, you will no longer be able to undo or redo changes. Headings The editing toolbar includes the option to format text as a heading. Such text will appear as a heading style when it is downloaded as a report. Use headings to ensure that your headings are formatted with consistent font size, styling etc. and any applicable numbering and inclusion in the Table of Contents. Important: Heading formatting will either be the Rico default or that which has been configured for your template. If you have any issues with heading styles contact support. Inserting Appendix References The editing toolbar includes the option to insert a live reference to an appendix added on the Appendices page. That means if any changes are made to appendices, such as title or ordering, references will update automatically to reflect this. To add an appendix reference: Click the location in the text field you’d like to insert an appendix reference. Click the insert reference button. This will open the insert reference window. Select the appendix to reference. The link icon on the right of the appendix item selector links to the Appendices page if you need to add any other appendices. Select the preferred reference format. The format of references can be changed to suit different preferences and contexts. Click ok to finish and insert the appendix reference. If the appendix that a reference is linked to is deleted, the reference will display “unknown appendix”. Double-clicking this reference will let you select another appendix to link to the reference. Inserting Figures Figures can be inserted into assessments on Rico. The insert figure button is found in the editing toolbar of a text field. Figures can be uploaded or selected from the standard GIS figures that are pulled into your project on the Subject Site page. To insert a figure into a text field: Click the location in the text field you’d like to insert a figure. Click the insert figure button in the editing toolbar. This will bring up the Insert figure window. Select the figure you’d like to insert from the selector. Add a caption as needed. Click ‘OK’ to finish and insert the figure into the text field. To upload a custom image: Go to the figures page, located on the left sidebar. There is also a shortcut to this page from the insert figure window. Drag and drop a PNG of JPEG image into the upload box at the top of the page or click Upload Names of figures can be edited once added to make these more clearly identifiable when inserting into assessments. Larger previews of figures can be viewed by clicking on figure thumbnails. Uploaded figures can be deleted by clicking the delete button at the right of the list of figures. GIS figures cannot be deleted. Import The editing toolbar includes the option to import data from another project on your organisation’s Rico account into a text field. This can be used to import an assessment from another project into the text box to help you complete the assessment you're writing (e.g. an exemplar assessment). To import an assessment from another project: Click in the text field where you’d like to insert an assessment from another project. (You can only import assessments from text boxes in identical locations on other projects.) Click the import button to open the import window. Select the source project you’d like to import an assessment from on the left. A preview of the assessment to be imported will be displayed in the preview box on the right, while a list of sections within that assessment will be displayed in the middle. Choose the relevant sections of the assessment you'd like to include using the check boxes. The preview will display the sections to be imported, only checked sections will be included. Once you’re happy with the assessment to be imported, click Import and this will insert the assessment into your text field. Tip: Use the import function when you're beginning an assessment, particularly if you're new to Rico. This will give you an exemplar of what to write, helping to guide your assessment, and save you writing the same stuff over and over. Todos The editing toolbar includes the option to mark a text field as ‘to-do’. This flags a text box to come back to later, both on the page itself and in the navigation menu in the left sidebar.
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Foss Shanahan
Feb 09, 2022
In FAQs
It’s important to know how considerations are detected in Rico to know what you’ve covered and ensure you don’t miss anything. Considerations are detected in three stages: through the Subject Site GIS Data, through the Project Checklist, and manually at the user's discretion on the Considerations page. What’s covered and what isn’t for each of these stages is described below. Subject Site The Subject Site page detects considerations that apply to a subject site, based on GIS Data for that land. Exception: Considerations that do not apply based on a subject site’s GIS Data (for example it only applies to a neighbouring site and not the subject site) aren’t detected. In rare cases, such situations can still result in considerations being relevant to a proposal. To ensure these are detected, we suggest reviewing the GIS Images on the Subject Site page for any features applying to neighbouring sites (and not the proposal) that may result in relevant considerations. Project Checklist Site Features In addition to the considerations detected on the Subject Site page, checklist questions aim to filter out considerations where their relevance is determined by the presence of a feature on and around the subject site that cannot be inferred automatically using GIS Data. Activities In addition to considerations detected by site features, further checklist questions aim to filter out considerations based on activities involved in a proposal. To do this, questions prompt you to recall any activities in your proposal that relate to a specific planning consideration. It’s not practical for us to ask you about every specific activity in a proposal at the checklist stage. Instead, Rico relies on you to relate the characteristics in your specific proposal to the questions asked and research an answer further where you’re unsure. You can investigate whether an underlying consideration is relevant to your proposal by answering yes to a question. This will display the consideration and let you jump refer directly to source planning documents (in the case of planning document considerations) to see whether it’s relevant. Exception: Planning documents can also be relevant where they contain matters (but not rules) that are relevant to a proposal’s assessment. The Project Checklist does not flag such documents and they must be added manually on the Considerations page. Such cases are rare, and when they exist, they are generally referred to by a planning document with rules that has already been detected (for example, refer to matters in ABC Planning Document for assessing applications triggering a given activity). Considerations The vast majority of considerations are detected through the Subject Site and Project Checklist pages, as described below. Where there are exceptions, like those described in the sections above, they must be manually added here.
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Foss Shanahan
Feb 09, 2022
In User Manual
The Considerations page lets you review the considerations triggered for a given proposal and add any relevant statutory documents to your project. Considerations Considerations are triggered on the Subject Site and Consideration Checklists pages. These are summarised on the Considerations page so you can take relevant actions to address these. There are two types of considerations: Considerations suggesting relevant statutory documents to assess Other considerations These are explained further below. Considerations suggesting relevant statutory documents to assess These considerations suggest that a statutory document is relevant to the proposal. 'Document' is a general term we use for groups of rules and activities within the statutory framework. For example, a section or chapter of a district plan, or a National Environmental Standard. Documents should be added to a project when they contain rules or provisions you would like to assess. To add a document from a consideration Click the add button. This is the circle button with the “+” symbol in the centre, displayed at the right of a consideration where this suggests a relevant document. Tip: You can review source documents to determine whether they’re relevant. The button to the left of the add button (with the document icon) links directly to source documents. This enables you to review source documents more closely to see if they contain rules and provisions relevant to the proposal. Removing a document from your project Documents can be removed from a project at any time by hitting the remove button, located in place of the add button once added. Other considerations Other considerations are any other considerations that affect the consent process e.g. an information requirement for resource consent application under Schedule 4 of the RMA. Other considerations don't have anything to add directly like a document. Instead, they are displayed as prompts to remind you to address these where you see most suitable in a project. All Documents Under the All Documents section you can add any document available on Rico. Given the Consideration Checklist only detects documents with relevant rules, this may be required where a document only contains provisions relevant to a proposal (and not rules). Given the Subject Site page only detects documents applying to the subject site, this may also be required where rules applying to areas outside the subject site apply to the proposal. See the instructions earlier in this post for adding and removing documents under All Documents.
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Foss Shanahan
Feb 09, 2022
In User Manual
The Consideration Checklists identifies considerations relevant to the proposal which have not already been detected automatically using GIS data on the Subject Site page. Using the Consideration Checklists Answering questions Questions prompt you to check for the presence of features at or around the subject site and groups of activities involved in the proposal. The answers to questions determine which considerations are relevant to a proposal. If you are unsure of an answer, you can leave a question for later. If you answer a question and would like to undo this, you can click the cancel button to clear your answer. Adding suggested documents If a question is answered yes, the underlying consideration(s) relating to that question are displayed. Where a document is suggested, this can be added to your project using the add button at the right of the consideration. See Considerations for more on the different types of considerations and how they work. If a question is answered no, the underlying consideration(s) are deemed irrelevant. In this way, the checklist narrows down considerations to those which are relevant to the proposal. Making comments on checklist answers Comments can be added to each question to provide any explanation, clarification or commentary on answers, as needed.
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Foss Shanahan
Feb 09, 2022
In User Manual
The Subject Site page is where the site of the proposal is identified and the relevant GIS Data is retrieved to assist in detecting relevant considerations for a proposal. Using the Subject Site page Adding site(s) Sites can be searched for by address(es). Appellation(s) are also displayed in the search results to confirm the correct parcel of land is selected. Additional addresses/parcels of land can then be added by clicking the ‘Add another address’ button. Where multiple addresses are added, GIS data will be presented in separate tabs for each site as different sites can have different data (zones, overlays etc.). Review and add suggested considerations The GIS data retrieved is used to suggest considerations that may be relevant to a proposal. Considerations appear below the GIS Data that triggers them as relevant. You can add suggested documents to a project at this stage by using the “+” button. All considerations detected are summarised on the considerations page later in the workflow. Review GIS Images A set of GIS Images for the subject site are displayed. It’s useful to check these for features in the surrounding area that may affect the project. The Consideration Checklist conducts a more detailed check for site features, however, these focus on features affecting the subject site rather than features in the surrounding area.
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Foss Shanahan
Nov 04, 2021
In FAQs
The following post outlines how reports are reviewed in Rico. General review process The general review process looks as follows: Author completes draft report Draft report is handed to Reviewer for review Reviewer makes changes and comments The reviewed report is passed back to the Author to accept / reject changes and make any further amendments Reviewing in Rico In Rico, we suggest the following approach: (Optional) When your report is ready for review, download a copy and save it as a ‘Draft’. This will store a local version of the report on your device which you can revert back to, should you wish to later on. Review reports in Rico using the Review tab. The Review tab enables you to see a preview of the report. Make sure the reviewer can log in to Rico, if they need a Rico login, don’t hesitate to get in touch with us (this is free). In the Review tab, you can scroll through the report. Clicking an area in the report will take you to the corresponding section in the workflow where you can make any changes. Make changes and comments. Rico does not have a tracked changes feature built in. If you wish to see any changes made between a draft and reviewed report, ensure you download a draft as detailed above, then you can compare a draft and reviewed report in MS Word using the ‘Compare’ function. To highlight any comments or changes to a user in Rico, use the highlight formatting. You can also add a ‘Todo’ where you’ve made such comments to help ensure these are addressed before finalising a report. Let the Author know you’ve made your review to finalise the report. The author will be able to see any highlighted changes and comments and ‘Todos’ and make any subsequent changes before downloading a finalised copy of the report. A few things to note: We recommend reviewing reports in Rico to keep assessments as up to date as possible for importing these into new applications in the future using the import function. You can output as many versions of a report as you wish, there is no constraint on this. Use an in-browser spell check such as Grammarly to detect spelling and grammar mistakes. We also recommend this is used by those writing reports. We’ve made a post for setting this up here.
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Foss Shanahan
Mar 01, 2021
In FAQs
Planning documents, such as the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) are constantly being updated. On Rico, we update our references to the AUP when plan changes are made operative. It is important to note, however, that Plan changes can have legal effect before they are made operative, as explained on the Environment Guide website here. Plan changes are also annotated throughout the AUP. On Rico, we directly link you to the live planning documents so you can see these as they apply to rules you’re dealing with. If you see a plan change, you can investigate these changes further on the Auckland Council website here.
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Foss Shanahan
Aug 31, 2020
In FAQs
When you download a document from Rico and open it in word, a number of spelling and grammar mistakes often show up that weren’t flagged in the browser. Fixing these can be tedious as any changes you make in MS Word must also be made in Rico to keep the information up to date. Good news, this problem can be easily prevented. Here’s how. The solution is Grammarly - which is essentially software you can plugin to your browser to perform spelling/grammar checks on all your writing. It’s free, easy to set up and will detect spelling/grammar errors on Rico before you’ve downloaded a word doc. To set up Grammarly, simply go to https://www.grammarly.com/ and click on the ‘Add to [Browser (e.g. Chrome)]’. The Grammarly website will step you through the setup. As part of this, you must make an account. The FREE standard version will perform all the necessary spelling/grammar checks, so just select this unless you want to pay for the extra features. After making an account, confirm Grammarly has been added to your browser under the ‘Apps’ section, pictured below. Once you’ve stepped through the setup, you should have a Grammarly logo in the top right corner of your browser as highlighted below. Click on this to open up your settings and confirm the following (highlighted below): Checking for writing suggestions on Rico is on (this should be on already by default) Your language is set to ‘Australian English’ (usually this has defaulted to American English which can cause errors). If you go to Rico now, you should also see the Grammarly symbol when you click into a text field at the bottom left corner. This spins as it’s scanning your text and will underline any mistakes as shown highlighted. Simply left-click these to see suggestions and make corrections. After that everything should be up and running. Don’t hesitate to get in touch with any questions by emailing support@rico.nz
How do I get spelling and grammar checks on Rico? content media
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Foss Shanahan

Foss Shanahan

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